A Guide to the National Resources Conservation Service

A Guide to the National Resources Conservation Service

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A Guide to the National Resources Conservation ServiceWhat is the National Resources Conservation Service?

The National Resources Conservation Service is a Federal agency of the United States Department of Agriculture aimed at providing technical assistance to the nation’s farmers and other private managers and land owners. The National Resources Conservation Service, which is formerly known as the Soil Conservation Service, underwent a name change in 1994 to reflect the department’s broader mission. The National Resources Conservation Service is a relatively small federal agency, currently comprised of roughly 12,000 government employees.

The National Resources Conservation Service is responsible for improving, protecting and conserving natural resource on private lands through a cooperative partnership with various local and state agencies throughout the United States. The primary focus of the National Resources Conservation Agency is focused on agricultural lands; however, the department has made numerous technical contributions to soil surveying, water quality and classification improvement.

National Resources Conservation Service Quick Facts:


The following details outline the administration of the National Resources Conservation Service:

The National Resources Conservation Service was formed on April 20, 1932

The headquarters of the National Resources Conservation Service are located in Washington D.C.

The National Resources Conservation Service is responsible for the jurisdiction over the Federal Government of the United States of America

The head of the National Resources Conservation Service is Dave White. The Acting Associate Chief of the department is currently Ginger Murphy.

History of the National Resources Conservation Service:

The National Resources Conservation Service was founded through the efforst of Hugh Bennett—a soil conservation pioneer who worked for the Department of Agriculture since the early 20th century. Bennet’s primary motivation was built off his knowledge concerning the detrimental effects of soil erosion and the negative impacts that such a process would place on American lands.
In September of 1933, the Soil Erosion Service was formed within the Department of the Interior, with Bennett acting as Chief. The service, two years later, was transferred to the Department of Agriculture and was then combined with other USDA units to form the Soil Conservation Service. On October 20, 1994, the agency was then renamed the Natural Resources Conservation Service where it was placed as part of the Federal Crop Insurance Reform and Department of Agriculture Reorganization Act of 1994.

Government Agency of the Executive Branch:


Government agencies are defined as organizations, councils, and offices operating under the jurisdiction of the Federal Government of the United States of America; each federal agency retains specific administrative jurisdiction over specific facets latent within the operations of the United States Government.
The National Resources Conservation Service functions as a government agency under the Executive Branch of the United States government, which is comprised of 3 total branches; in addition to the Executive branch – which is responsible for the regulation and enforcement of operational legislation existing within the United States of America – there also exists the Legislative and Judicial Branches.

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