Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service Quick Facts

Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service Quick Facts

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Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service Quick FactsWhat is the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service?

The Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service is an independent agency of the United States Federal Government, responsible for providing mediation services to industry, communities, and government agencies throughout the world. In a simplistic sense, the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service is responsible for settling or resolving disputes between organizations and communities throughout the globe.
The Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service was created under the terms of the Labor Management Relations Act of 1947 (also known as the Taft-Hartley Act), to replace the United States Conciliation Service operating within the Department of Labor. When created, the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service offered services upon request or in disputes affecting interstate commerce and was originally required to be notified within 30 days of the expiration of a contract where either side proposed some sort of modification or a request of termination for the existing contract.

Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service Quick Facts

The following details outline the administration of the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service:
The Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service was founded on June 23 of 1947
The headquarters of the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service are located in Washington, D.C.
The Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service is responsible for the jurisdiction over the Federal Government of the United States of America
The head of the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service is Agency Director George Cohen
The Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service operates with approximately 275 employees

What is an Independent Government Agency?

An independent agency of the United States Federal Government is a department or organization that exists outside of the federal executive departments or those headed by a Cabinet secretary. In a more specific sense, the term Independent Government Agency, is used to describe agencies that, while constitutionally operating within the executive branch, are free from presidential authority or control, as a result of the President’s limited membership within the agency.
Independent government agencies are established through separate statutes passed by the United States Congress; each respective statutory grant of authority will define the goals or mission that the agency must work towards, in addition to the substantive areas, if applicable, over which the Independent Agency may have the power of rulemaking. These agency regulations, when enforced, maintain the power of federal law.

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