A Guide to the Executive Office for Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Forces

A Guide to the Executive Office for Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Forces

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A Guide to the Executive Office for Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task ForcesWhat is the Executive Office for Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Forces (OCDETF)?

The Executive Office for Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Forces is a Federal agency responsible for the facilitation of criminal investigations and preventative measures undertaken in order to deride criminal activity involving the sale and proliferation of illegal drugs, as well as the prevention of organized criminal activity; in many cases, organized criminal activity and drug offenses will occur in tandem with one another.
Furthermore, the OCDETF is responsible for the collection of intelligence with regard to primary suspects and targets for investigations, which is referred to as the Attorney General's Consolidated Priority Organization Target (CPOT); the OCDETF is overseen by Attorney General Eric Holder:

Executive Office for Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Forces Quick Facts

The following details outline the administration of the Executive Office for Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Forces:

The Executive Office for Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Forces was founded in 1982; currently, the OCDETF has been responsible for the apprehension of upwards of $3 billion in monies and assets utilized in order to commit drug offenses and organized crime
The headquarters of the Executive Office for Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Forces are located in Washington, D.C.

The OCDETF functions as a government agency under the Executive Branch of the United States government, which is comprised of 3 total branches; in addition to the Executive branch – which is responsible for the regulation and enforcement of operational legislation existing within the United States of America – there also exists the Legislative and Judicial Branches

Agencies Associated with the Executive Office for Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Forces


Government agencies are defined as organizations, councils, and offices operating under the jurisdiction of the Federal Government of the United States of America; each federal agency retains specific administrative jurisdiction over specific facets latent within the operations of the United States Government:

The United States Department of Justice and the OCDETF


The Department of Justice is a federal agency within the Executive Branch of the government responsible for the supervision of the Executive Office for Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Forces, which is considered to be a sub division within the USDDOJ. The primary objectives of the Department of Justice is the undertaking of investigation and prosecution all manners of criminal activity existing on a national level, which includes crimes occurring on both foreign and interstate levels; the focus of the OCDETF is the prevention, investigation, and apprehension of individuals – and organizations – engaging in all manners of criminal activity involving drugs and organized crime.

The Attorney General of the United States and the OCDETF


The Office of the Attorney General of the United States is responsible for both the administration and oversight of the OCDETF; the Attorney General serves as the primary attorney within legal hearings concerning the United States – the Attorney General serves as representation for both the collective citizenship of the United States, as well as the for the Federal Government of the United States of America. Furthermore, the Attorney General will only provide counsel within Federal courts.

Executive Office for Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Forces Legality


The OCDETF can be contacted through

Executive Office for Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Forces
c/o United States Department of Justice

950 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW

Washington, DC

20530

(202) 252-1000

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