A Guide to the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation

A Guide to the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation

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A Guide to the Advisory Council on Historic PreservationWhat is the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation?

The Advisory Council on Historic Preservation is an independent agency of the United States Federal Government that is responsible for promoting the enhancement, preservation and productive use of the country’s historic resources. Furthermore, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation will advise the President and Congress of the United States in regards to the national historic preservation policy.

What is the Goal of the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation?

The goal of the National Historic Preservation Council, which was created by the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, is to have Federal agencies act as responsible stewards of the country’s resources when their actions specifically affects historic properties. The Advisory Council on Historic Prevention stands alone as the only entity with the formal legal responsibility to encourage federal agencies to factor historical preservation into future Federal project requirements.

As directed by the National Historic Preservation Act, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation will serve as the primary federal policy advisor to the President of the United States and Congress. In general, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation will recommend various administrative and legislative improvements in regards to protecting the nation’s heritage and will advocate full consideration of historic values when the federal decision-making process is undertaken.
Furthermore, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, will review federal programs and policies to promote effectiveness, consistency and coordination with respect to the nation’s preservation policies.

Organization of the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation:

The Advisory Council on Historic Preservation consists of 23 members, who are apart of various federal, local and state governmental departments. The majority of members (all but two) are formally appointed by the President of the United States; membership is laid out in the 1966 Historic Preservation Act, which organized the agency to include a chairman, who is appointed by the President of the United States, following a general public selection.
Furthermore, the president will also appoint other members, including the Secretary of the Interior, the Secretary of Agriculture, the Architect of the Capitol, experts from the field of historic preservation, a state governor, a mayor, three members of the general public and one member of an Indian tribe.



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